Harmattan in Lagos, Nigeria

Amihan (Day 21) : Word High July

image

Amihan – Northeast wind, breeze
Word High July

Last week, I taught the topic Ecology and one important abiotic factor – Wind, in the terrestrial habitat.

Wind is air in motion. I discovered in the course of teaching that class that the northeast wind brings harmattan to Nigeria.

The harmattan hits us in December. It is the season associated with Christmas. I remember many times when I sniff the air and say “I smell Christmas.” The mornings are usually foggy and very cold. No one wants to get up and start working. Those who have to go to work so early, drag their butts off the bed and get going. You find people who would normally wear light cotton materials, put on suits and coats and shoes to work, then every child is wrapped in heavy woolen sweaters or hoods. The children who forget to use lip balms or petroleum jelly on their lips, get their lips dried and cracked. Many people at this period eat spicy food to keep warm. Some children who do not heed the parents warning usually look white, mothers make sure children get enough petroleum jelly for their arms, legs and faces.

Harmattan ends when January ends and then we can enjoy the hot weather.

This is an account of what harmattan is like in Lagos, Western Nigeria. I hear from my friends who live in the North that it is a lot worse than what we face in Lagos. They are close to the Sahara desert, they get the Northeast wind first hand.
© Deborah Glover, 2016

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Harmattan in Lagos, Nigeria

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s